New Fall Tv 2015: The Alternates

Quanticoimgres-3

 September 27th, ABC

In the present, Alex Parrish (Priyanka Chopra) along with her fellow new FBI recruits enter the Quantico training base. Flash-forward to the future where a terrorist attack on America has just taken place and Alex Parrish is the primary suspect. The only way to prove her innocence is by finding evidence to prove that the real terrorist mole was someone else from her FBI recruit class. The series will employ a very similar timeline thread to tie a Quantico recruit story with Alex Parrish determining if they are the mole, or not; very similar to the plot device used in How to Get Away with Murder.

Hopefully, Priyanka Chopra can deliver this fall and her character Alex Parrish can join the ABC leading lady character ranks alongside, Annalise Keating (Viola Davis), Olivia Pope (Kerry Washington), and Meredith Grey (Ellen Pompeo). Earlier this summer Varitey reported that CW alum Rick Cosnet has joineimgres-4d the show as a recurring character. He will play Elias Harper, a defense attorney recruited by Alex Parrish in the future. The first season will air its thirteen-episode run on ABC this fall and the producers promise to reveal the terrorist’s identity in the finale.

To watch the Quantico trailer click here

The Man in the High Castle

imgres-2November 20th, Amazon

Based on Philip K. Dick’s alternate history novel, about America in the 1960s, if the Axis powers had won World War II. We are introduced to Joe Blake (Luke Kleintank), as a twenty-seven year old New Yorker, who wants to join the resistance. He receives instructions from a resistance leader and begins to make his way to the “neutral zone.” In this version of America the Nazis govern over the land east of the Rockies, while the Japanese rule the over the Pacific states. In the pilot episode we are also introduced to Juliana Crain (Aleximages-2a Davalos), who peacefully resides in the Pacific states. Her resolve to remain quietly living in the shadows ends after her sister Trudy gives her a messenger bag and then moments later is killed by Japanese officers. Juliana is so disturbed by the injustice done to her sister that she finds herself on a mission to the man in the high castle. By the end of the episode both Juliana Crain and Joe Blake cross paths on their way to join the resistance, but do they both have the same intentions?

The pilot plays like an extended Twilight Zone episode. The set designers do a great job including disconcerting reminders about the series’ premise, within each set piece. On the surface level it’s a spy thriller set during the 1960s, but the historical imgres-1fiction twist causes a disturbing ripple effect that resonates with the viewer across the screen.

To watch The Man in the High Castle pilot click here

Containmentimgres

January 2016, CW 

Executive Producer Julie Plec, known for mainly the supernatural genre (The Vampire Diaries, The Originals), attempts science fiction with her latest project titled, Containment. The series chronicles a deadly virus outbreak in Atlanta that leads to federal officials setting up a quarantine section of the state.  Families are torn apart as they find themselves on opposite sides of the containment section.   As the virus grows within the Atlanta quarantine section, viewers will observe a decline of society, as these ordinary people become survivalists.

imagesThe series features a predominately young cast with David Gyasi (Interstellar), Chris Wood (The Vampire Diaries), KristenGutoskie (Rookie Blue), Christina Marie Moses (Nikita), and newcomer George Young.  During the first season the show will flash back and forth from the present Atlanta quarantine situation with how the outbreak first started.  In true Julie Plec fashion the emphasis will be placed on who these characters become when placed in this situation of duress.

To watch Containment trailer click here

By Sarah Belmont
Featured Writer
@sjbelmont

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2.29 – The Asshole Chronicles (SUPER EXPLICIT)

Wanna be on the show? Send a message to @SceneNNerd on Twitter or SceneNNerd@gmail.com to have your questions and comments read on the show. On today’s episode, the gang welcomes the hilarious KC of The Geeks With Wives Podcast. Casey also meets Sarah for the first time. Pete gives us the movies out in theaters and on DVD this week, Casey straight up backhands the weekly entertainment news, Matt is dearly missed by all, and Sarah tries to keep them all in line. They have a discussion about where the Marvel MCU is heading, they go in depth on the Mr. Robot finale, they create some new nicknames and catch-phrases, learn about Alaska, and just generally yell at each other. A new record for most profanities-per-minute has been set, it’s an all new Scene ‘N Nerd!

Netflix Narcos: Colombians, Americans, Dreams, & Drugs

 This post is a recap of the first three episodes of Narcos season one and contains spoilers.

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“Magical realism is defined as what happens when a highly detailed, realistic setting is invaded by something too strange to believe… There is a reason magical realism was born in Colombia.”

This quote is seen above the Andes Mountains during the opening sequence of Narcos’ first episode. This Netflix original series chronicles Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar’s (Wagner Moura) infamous rise to power during the 70s and 80s. Through the use of a Goodfella’s inspired first person narrative, voiced by DEA agent Steve Murphy (Boyd Hollbrock), viewers feel a sense of familiarity with the story, even though it’s set in a foreign land.  Note that since this series predominately takes place in Colombia each episode contains a large amount of subtitles.  Narcos is an early drug war story, as Steve Murphy explains why both him and his wife head to Colombia at the end of episode one, “This wasimages my war. This was my duty, and I was ready to fight.”

The second episode, The Sword of Simon Bolivar, show both Pablo Escobar and Steve Murphy establishing themselves as the hero in this tale.  For example we see the Colombian law enforcement agency partner Steve Murphy with local officer Javier Pena (Pedro Pascal). Yes, this show has an odd-couple cop pairing that’s a common troupe within the genre.  Javier understands how to obtain information in Colombia, often through bribes, which goes against Steve Murphy’s American rules.  Meanwhile, we are given a history lesson about the Medellín Cartel.  Their first claim to fame came from taking down a libertarian group known as the M-19.  In an attempt to send Pablo Escobar a message, the M-19 capture an Ocha girl, who is works for the cartel.  Escobar understands the politics involved with the game he is playing, as he capitalizes on this local tragedy.  Pablo Escobar is able to have the M-19 leader, Ivan, release the girl unharmed; thus the drug lord becomes a hero. Based on this episode two recap, you can see how this series was written in the same vain as The Wire. Each episode includes both a criminal and DEA arc therefore allowing both sides of the war to be fully realized.

          “There is a reason magical realism was born in Colombia.”images-1

In the third episode, The Men of Always, we understand the ties that bind magical realism to Colombia.  They are the same binds that tie the American dream to the United States.  Throughout the episode we see Pablo Escobar get swept up in a race for congress in Colombia.  At this point he has fully harnessed the idea that money can buy you both power and influence, in a poor country.  Now he wants to buy congress to fulfill his own personal political ambitions. “It’s a country where dreams and reality are conflated.  Where in their heads people can fly as high as Icarus,” explains Steve Murphy.  The reality is that Pablo Escobar is a drug lord, not a congressman, and Colombia cannot afford to become “a state of narcos.”  Meanwhile Steve Murphy and Javier Pena don’t get swept up in their dream of taking down the entire Medellín Cartel, but focus on keeping Pablo Escobar out of congress.  They manage to do so, by obtaining a photo negative of Pablo Escobar’s mugshot from a previous arrest for drug trafficking.  In a superb sequence we see that Pablo Escobar, “flew too close to the sun,” and is thrown out of the Colombian congress.  imgres-1

Both the American dream, that Steve Murphy has to end the war on drugs, and Pablo Escobar’s magical realism ambition, to politically rule over Colombia;  are the simple daydreams of men.  Their reality is that they are on opposites sides of a never ending war on drugs. The melding between fact and fiction continues to be seen as historical footage from this time period is used in each episode. Colombia is a real place, this story is based on real events, these characters are based on real people; yet this tale still retains a sense of wonder amongst the dreams of men.

Netflix has already renewed the show for a second season to be released next year.  Season one trailer click here

By Sarah Belmont
Featured Writer
@sjbelmont

New Fall TV 2015: The Darkhorses

The Bastard Executionerimgres-1

Premieres September 15th, on FX

Wilkin Brattle, played by Lee Jones, is a 14h century English soldier and under the charge of Edward the First. After the horrors of war follow him home and revenge is directed towards his loved ones, Brattle retires from being a warrior. The first season will revolve around Brattle’s forced return to the English court, as he claims the executioner title. He exchanges one blood-splattered sword for another; past burdens of guilt for new ones; and finds himself to be a different type of merciless weapon within this medieval political system.imgres

Beloved Sons of Anarchy show runner Kurt Sutter is the man behind this new period drama. He understands the early comparisons between his newest creation and HBO’s Game of Thrones. The 14th century English court system politics and Brattle’s newfound faith in the catholic religion will root this series in the history books. While characters like Annora of the Alders, played by Katey Sagal, is a mysterious healer who will entangle Brattle’s story with medieval mysticism. Much like it’s predecessor the Bastard Executioner’s first season will consist of ten episodes.

FX’s The Bastard Executioner trailer click here

Flesh & Bone

Premieres November 8th, on Starzimgres-2

An eight-episode miniseries structured as a look inside the lives of ballerinas and written in the vain of the critically acclaimed film Black Swan. The series tells the tortured tale of Claire (Sarah Hay), a talented ballerina who is running from a dark past and finds herself joining a New York City company. The trailer promises that this will be a brutally honest look at both Claire’s and her fellow ballerinas struggle for perfection. Filled with eating disorders, rigorous training schedules that result in self-mutilating practices and the self-esteem shattering competitiveness found in this chosen profession.

The most haunting image from the trailer is of a padlocked bedroom door. We don’timages see the intruder’s face from behind the door, but we hear his voice as he demands that Claire let him inside. This indicates that Claire is potentially running from an abusive childhood and was sexually assaulted by her stepfather (maybe). Therefore, Claire could possibly be suffering from PTSD as she joins this ballet company. Former Breaking Bad executive producer and writer, Moria Walley-Beckett is the series’ creator. Knowing that Walley-Beckett is directing the ship dispels my belief that the series could potentially fall more in step with the film Center Stage, than Black Swan.

Starz Flesh & Bone trailer click here

Into the Badlands

imgres-3Premieres November 15th, on AMC

Welcome to the Badlands. A six-episode series that combines the stylized-western
aesthetic of Django Unchained with, the graceful violence found in Kill Bill. This martial arts series is based on the Chinese tale Journey To The West. A fierce enslaved warrior (known as a clipper in the show) named Sunny, played by executive-producer Daniel Wu, stumbles across a young boy named M.K., played by Aramis Knight. They develop a mentor/protégé relationship as they journey together across the dangerous land run by feudal barons.

The most intriguing aspect of the series stems from the villainess named the Widow, portrayed by Emily Beecham.   We are introduced to her as the one behind images-1the attempted capture of M.K., for unknown reasons.  Throughout the Comic-Con trailer we see her deviously wonder the Badlands, as she seeks to claim power by overthrowing the mighty Badland baron, Quinn. Then in a stunning sequence we watch the petite baroness turn into a lethal weapon, as she takes on a slough of assassins in a western burlesque bar.  Much like how The Walking Dead brought new life to the zombie genre, Into the Badlands shows promise in resurrecting the Kung-Fu martial arts genre.  Plus, this maybe the closest thing we will ever have to a Quentin Tarantino television series.

AMC Into the Badlands trailer click here

By Sarah Belmont
Featured Writer
@sjbelmont

iZombie S1: Liv, Lilywhite, & Avoid

imgres“You’re a zombie well, you’ve been a zombie since that night at the lake.  Instead of telling me the truth you decided that it would be easier to break my heart.” -Major Lilywhite (1×13)

Liv Moore is a zombie.  A former doctor, now a mortician; formally engaged, now terminally single; former foodie, now eats brains drenched in hot sauce; a former healer, now psychic; formally alive, now mostly dead.  Throughout the first season we watch as Liv remains stuck in her former life, with her best friend/roommate, Peyton; pinning for her ex-fiance, Major Lilywhite and navigate a strained relationship with her mother and brother.  Meanwhile her new boss Dr. Ravi Chakrabarti almost immediately discovers Liv’s secret and becomes her confidant.  They form an unlikely partnership with Detective Clive Babineaux and help solve various homicides.    images

“You couldn’t ask that of me, but you turned me into a zombie without my permission.”-Major Lilywhite (1×13)

Blaine DeBeers is also a zombie…the one who turned Liv, along with a bunch of others.  During the first season co-showrunners Diane Ruggiero and Rob Thomas, masterfully retain the relevance of Major Lilywhite’s storyline in the show, while leaving him in the dark about Liv. They carefully allow him to act as the hero in this story as he discovers Blaine’s entire operation, from the “brains” running, to the turing of the city’s most wealthy and influential citizens into zombies.  Too bad Major Lilywhite is no match for Blaine, on his own, and winds up in a freezer for the majority of the finale.  Liv comes to the rescue where she finds herself for the second time, with the opportunity to kill Blaine once and for all.  If she kills him then what happens to all of thimages-5e zombies that he has created?  Yes, Blaine creates the demand for brains, but he is also the supplier too.

“That’s what helps you sleep at night?  What about me?  What’s the greater good for me?” –Major Lilywhite (1×13)

Liv decides to just shot Blaine, not kill him.  Only to the discover Major slowly bleeding out in the freezer, after Blaine shot him just moments before.  In a fit of rage, Liv uses one dose of the cure on Blaine.  Then selfishly scratches Major Lilywhite in an attempt to turn him into a zombie, instead of losing him forever. Ironically in the previous episode the writers began to set up a storyline of having Liv’s little brother work for Blaine.  We see her brother arrive for work the next day, only to have the shop blowup, with him standing right outside the front door.

images-1“It’s not what fate dealt me…You did, the same person who let me check myself into a mental hospital…who let me think I was crazy.” –Major Lilywhite (1×13)

The finale ends with Liv standing outside of the intensive care unit, as she watches her brother go into cardiac arrest.  The screen dissolves to black after Liv says, “No,” in response to her mother’s pleas for Liv to save her brother.  Overall episode thirteen was the best episode in the first season, as the writers ended the Liv versus Blaine storyline.  While allowing Major Lilywhite and Liv to have the first honest conversation about their relationship all season. The same one being quoted throughout this entire post.  This scene echoes the theme of “avoidance” that can be found in most shows dealing with supernatural creatures.  Liv was turned into a zombie, and in turn avoided death.  After someone finds a way around the finality of death, then their first instinct when confronting it again, is to avoid it…or prevent others from experiencing it as well.  Later, in an act of penance Liv gives Major Lilywhite the second dose of the cure.

images-2When you had a chance to play God and decide wether I die, or became this…Did you decide based on what you wanted, or what you thought I wanted?” -Major Lilywhite (1×13)

iZombie season two will premiere on the CW network on October 6th.  Liv, Clive, and Ravi will continue to work together solving various homicides. Viewers will learn through both Major Lilywhite and Blaine about the side effects of the cure.  I am particularly interested in watching how Blaine re-adapts to theimages-3 world without his power as a zombie.  Will Major Lilywhite ever make peace with Liv? Will Peyton not only forgive Liv, but Ravi too from keeping the secret from her? Hopefully the writers creativity will seep down from the over-arching story lines and into the case storyline found in each episode.  If you missed season one do not be dissuaded into just starting with season two…as things are just getting interesting here in this zombie land.

By Sarah Belmont
Featured Writer
@sjbelmont

Mr Robot the Finale & the Fool

Hello friend.

Did you watch the finale?

Here is what I saw.

Mr Robot’s season one finale is aptly titled, zer0-day.avi, a reference to when an undisclosed and uncorrected application threatens a computer system. The vulnerability within the computer’s software can be exploited and adversely affect by additional computers and imgresother networks.

The finale’s opening scene took us back to where we began, with Elliott’s take down of Michael Hansen, I mean Lenny. Krista meets her former beau at a restaurant, where Michael attempts to talk Krista into providing information for him to use against Elliott. “This kid should not be allowed to do what he did,” explains Michael. Their conversation continues and then takes a turn after Michael discloses that all Elliott wanted was for him to leave Krista alone. The nobility behind Elliott’s action, no matter his means, allows him to remain a hero in her eyes. The Mr Robot title sequence appears on screeimages-2n right after Michael has connected Elliott to the global hack currently being covered by all the major news networks.   Now that Elliott has decided to play hero for the rest of the world, is he still a noble knight, or the court jester? The fool…the madman.

“Where am I? Seriously, what do you remember? Wait, I don’t even trust you.”-Elliott

Elliott is a madman, as he wakes up in Tyrell’s abandoned car all alone. He has no memory of how he got there, or how many days he has been “asleep” for, or where Tyrell is at the moment. While Elliott tries to remembeimages-3r, in the background on a wall there is a graffiti mural of a man in a suit completing the heart in a I heart NY logo. The image is very reminiscent of a ringleader at a circus, one who is putting on a glorious show for the audience. Elliott heads to E-Corp, determined to find Tyrell, and he finds their offices in utter chaos, thanks to the fsociety hack.  Circus music begins to play as Elliott wonders around the corridors, as he narrates each step of their master plan. Therefore alluding to the fact that he is the ringleader behind this new world…behind this circus.

image“Come out…I need to know what happened…Come out…I’m here waiting for you.”- Elliott

Elliott’s episode arc through most of the finale, is very similar to his arc in episode six-titled, v1ew-S0urce.flv. In that episode he plays a “zero-sum game” with Vera, and then discovers Shayla’s dead body, in the trunk, at the end.  In retrospect Elliott knew the whole time that both of them were not going to make it out alive. Now in this episode all signs suggest that Elliott killed Tyrell, unfortunately we will have to wait until next season to know for sure. Note, that when Elliott returns to Tyrell’s abandoned car, he checks the trunk first. Elliott is the ringleader, who can’t seem to remember what he did prior to the hack.  In the previous episode Elliott acknowledges that he is Mr Robotimgres-1,  admitting to having dissociative identity disorder. For people with this condition when they can’t remember previous events in their lives, it indicates that a different personality was in control during the time that they have forgotten.  Mr. Robot finally appears just as  Elliott is about to turn himself in to the officials for the hack. He explains to Elliott that they both know where Tyrell is, “So do you… you forget kiddo, I am you.”  Then in an epic scene where the camera breaks from Elliott’s narrative perspective, for a brief moment, it shows him up against a wall, while choking himself, with his own hand. Yes, if this scene is an indication of anything, it’s that to the outside world Elliott is a madman…a fool.

“I am only supposed to be your prophet. You’re supposed to be my God.”-  Mr. Robot

imagesNow rewind back to the pilot, remember the scene after Elliott finds out that, with his help, fsociety has taken down E-Corp CTO Terrence Colby? He runs out into the middle of Time-Square and amongst a sea of people raises his hands in victory. Fast forward to the finale; fsociety has won and we find Elliott being carried by Mr. Robot, amongst a sea of people wearing fsociety masks, in Time Square.  Mr. Robot not only was successful in making fsociety achieve their goal, but allowed Elliott not to be alone in the world anymore. Throughout the episode we see frequent cuts to TV screens, as reporters cover the fsociety hack and it’s worldwide ramifications.  Whileimages-1, Elliott searches for Tyrell he encounters various people wearing the fsociety face mask on the New York City streets. The two argue once again, and Mr. Robot gives a great monologue about the translucent definition of reality in the 21st century.  His angry rant is reminiscent of Elliott’s subconscious, one that is about everything wrong in the world, back in the pilot episode.  By creating Mr. Robot and creating us, Elliott dissociates himself from his actions against fsociety.  Now that in reality society is just as angry as Elliott he finds himself even more unstable then before, “I want to be alone…I nimgreseed to be alone,” states Elliott as he closes his eyes to the outside world.

“Whoever is behind this, they’re just people…like you…and me…except of course, I have the full weight of the world’s biggest conglomerate behind me…you’ll come to realize that when you have that…matters like this…tend to crack.” –Philip Price

The only thing that Elliott cannot separate himself from is Mr. Robot.  Now aware of his own mental state, he allows his prophet to tell him what to do next. Elliott lifts up the hood of his black sweatshirt, symbolic that his alter ego has taken control, and returns home to his humble fortress.  The finale concludes with Elliott opening his door to an unknown person.  During the season finale, Elliott may have tentatively cracked under the pressure of being the ringleader behind fsociety and their global hack; Elliott may be a mad man but he is “no more mad than” Feste, the fool in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.

imgres-1SceneNNerd will continue to discuss Mr. Robot’s season finale during our next podcast episode.  Go to iTunes to rate and subscribe.  Check out our podcast episode called Hanging with Mr Robot for discussion about the season overall. 

Goodbye friend.

See you for season two.  

By Sarah Belmont
Featured Writer
@sjbelmont

Mr Robot Decrypted S1: Part II

Hello friend.

“Please tell me that you’re seeing this too…”-Elliott (1×01)

There are imagestwo water paintings hanging up outside of Krista’s office.  The one on the left features a family heading into an old farmhouse, with one figure remaining behind, by the fence.  The one on the right features the same family, now behind the farm house playing together in the fields.  The fourth figure does not appear in the painting on the right, he only appears in the other one. The first time that we see these paintings is in episode two, right after Elliott decides that Vera, “can’t be allowed to exist anymore.” Then we observe his therapy session with Krista, where they discuss the “allusion of control.” Elliott is only comfortable when he feels in control. He assumes power by hacking into the personal lives of others online, and then constructs boundaries within his personal relationships. Elliott would choose to remain behind, by the fence, while his family goes to play in the fields.  That’s an easy choice for him, the hard ones come when others are involved.  Adding Shayla to the equation made Elliott force his hand in terms of Vera. But did he make a decision, or was the choice already “pre-paid” for him a long time ago?

“Intentions are irrelevant, they don’t drive us, daemons do.”-Elliott (1×3)

imageThe paintings can be see again, in the background as Krista lets Elliott into her office at the end of episode seven. Unfortunately, moments later Krista discovers that by having Elliott as a patient, she’s letting him into her entire life. Beneath the bank statements, online site profiles, pornography, beneath everything; Elliott finds their one honest connection; they are just two lonely people in the world. “I want out of this loneliness, just like you, is that what you wanted to hear?” cries Elliott in episode seven.  After the end of the title sequence during episode eight, we see Elliott facing the paintings again, as his monologue begins, “But you have to admit, she’s just like everyone else, too afraid to peek over their walls for fear of what they might see.” The camera zooms in on the lone figure standing by the fence.

When Shayla was still alive he could of possibly wanted to join the others and play behind the farmhouse.  Now that she is dead, he wants to remain behind while the others go ahead without him.  He wants to remain by the fence to control who comes in and who leaves.  Again, is it Elliott’s choice, or did a “daemon” already make it for him?  Is he in control, or under the false allusion imageof control?

“People who are violent get that way, because they can’t communicate.” –Mr Robot (1×03)

During the third episode’s opening sequence we see Tyrell Wellick come undone, and still remains in control. Now that Terrance Colby has been removed from the situation, Tyrell has the opportunity to become the youngest CTO that E-Corp has ever seen. Then Philip Price awkwardly turns him down, because Scott Knowles has taken the position, right out from under him. Instead of causing a scene at the office, Tyrell takes his anger to the street, literally. He exchanges money with a homeless man, and they agree to fight one another. Tyrell retains control as he stripes away pieces of his business attire; his watch, sports coat, tie, and undoes the top buttons on his dress shirt. Then he pulls out a pair of surgical gloves, not boxing gloves, or a knuckle brace to wear during the fight…but surgical gloves. Tyrell is a man of discipline, order, cleanliness, and sustainability. Therefore he is a man who needs to keep his imagehands clean; of dirt, germs, blood, but mostly importantly clean from failure.

Tyrell is without his control, his surgical gloves, while on the rooftop with Sharon Knowles during episode seven. “Scott plans on firing you, and you are clinging on to any chance you can get…you seem desperate,” explains Sharon moments before Tyrell chokes her to death. Yes, in the face of failure Tyrell is desperate for control. In one moment of pure impulse Tyrell takes the life of another, which simultaneously sends his own life into a tailspin. During the next two episodes Tyrell loses both his job and family to his mistake, his failure.  Again, did Tyrell decide to take the life of Sharon Knowles, or did the impulse stem from the “allusion of control,”pre-paid for” by a “daemon”?

“The lock pick, every hacker’s favorite sport.  The perfect system to crack mostly, because unlike virtual systems, when you break it, you can see it…hear it…feel it.”-Elliott (1×02)

“I don’t know what you’re master plan is, but I need to…and you’re going to tell me,” Tyrell calmly says to Elliott as he slips on his pair of surgical gloves. Instead of sharing the same guilt that Elliott felt for having a hand in Shayla’s death, Tyrell felt a moment of “pure power,”while strangling Sharon.  In this scene Tyrell posters and asserts his dominance as he describes how it felt to murder someone…by his own two hands.  Cut to Elliott letting him into the fsociety arcade.  Why would Eimgres-1lliott let in someone who diametrically opposes him?  If in the wake of Shayla’s death, Elliott chose to stay behind and be the gatekeeper, why open it for Tyrell?  Sam Esmail is the real “daemon” threatening to take down Elliott’s construction of reality. After viewing episode ten we will have completed one “perfect” maze friend.  Will you be ready for the next one?

Writer’s note:  A daemon is a computer program that runs in the background, without interference from the user in control.

 By Sarah Belmont
Featured Writer
@sjbelmont